Email Marketing

Email Marketing KPIs You Should Be Tracking

Email Marketing KPIs You Should Be Tracking

Email marketing is a critical component of any successful marketing strategy. But if you can’t measure the results, how do you know whether it’s working? In this blog post, we’ll discuss the key performance indicators (KPIs) you should be tracking in your email marketing campaign. We’ll start with the most important metric – the goal of your campaign. Once you know what your goal is, we’ll show you which metrics to track to measure success. Let’s get started!

1- CTR

This is the most important metric for any email marketing campaign. Your Click-Through Rate will show you how many people are actually clicking on the links in your email. A high CTR means that your email is relevant and interesting to your audience. There are a few different ways to improve your CTR, including:

– Creating compelling subject lines

– Offering something of value in your email

– Asking questions in your email

– Including images in your email

– Making it easy to unsubscribe from your emails

Check out this blog to help you with *your email campaign CTR*.

How to calculate CTR?

To calculate your CTR, simply take the number of clicks on your email divided by the number of emails delivered and then multiply the number by 100. For example, if you sent 1000 emails and got 100 clicks, your CTR would be 100/1000.

2- Conversion Rate

The second metric you should be tracking is conversion rate. It is the number of people who take the desired action divided by the total number of email recipients. This metric will be different for every campaign, depending on what you’re trying to achieve. For example, if you’re promoting a new product, your goal might be to get people to click through to your website and purchase the product.

How to calculate the conversion rate?

To calculate your conversion rate, take the number of people who took the desired action and divide it by the total number of emails delivered then multiply by 100. For example, if you sent 1000 emails and 100 people purchased the product, your conversion rate would be 100/1000, or 0.01 (one percent) * 100.

3- Bounce Rate

Bounce rate is the percentage of people who receive your email and don’t open it. A high bounce rate indicates that your emails are not relevant to your audience. There are a few different ways to improve your bounce rate, including:

– Sending more targeted emails

– Creating compelling subject lines

– Including images in your email

How to calculate the bounce rate?

To calculate your bounce rate, take the number of people who received your email and didn’t open it divided by the total number of emails delivered then multiply by 100. For example, if you sent 1000 emails and 50 people bounced, your bounce rate would be 50/1000 or 0.05 (five percent).

Here are some hacks you can use to reduce your bounce rate.

4- Open Rate

Open rate is the number of people who open your email divided by the total number of emails delivered. A low open rate indicates that your subject line wasn’t effective or your email wasn’t relevant to your audience.

How to calculate the open rate?

To calculate your open rate, take the number of people who opened your email divided by the total number of emails delivered then multiply by 100. For example, if you sent 1000 emails and 500 people opened them, your open rate would be 500/1000 or 0.50 (fifty percent).

5- Unsubscribe Rate

The unsubscribe rate is the number of people who unsubscribe from your email list divided by the total number of emails delivered multiplied by 100. A high unsubscribe rate indicates that your emails are not relevant to your audience or you’re sending too many emails.

Email marketing is a powerful tool that can help you reach your marketing goals. By tracking the right metrics, you can see what’s working and what needs to be improved.

What other email marketing KPIs do you track? Let us know in the comments below! And if you need any help with your email marketing, contact us today!

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